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MBT waste processing leachate a waste of money

Leachate Quality from Landfilled MBT Waste and Why MBT is an Unjustified Waste of Money

In a research project completed on behalf of the UK Environment Agency data was collected data and leachates were sampled from EU landfills that had received imports of MSOR (Mechanically Sorted Organic Refuse) and Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) wastes, several years ago. The results of the sampling exercise were analysed for, the presence of trace […]

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leachate recirculation in a landfill

Leachate Recirculation Practise and Views

To the site operator leachate recirculation would certainly appear like commonsense as some of the leachate recirculated will be taken in by the waste and not re-appear. The leachate will gain some treatment – especially a significant reduction in BOD and COD by anaerobic digestion within a methanogenic landfill. In addition, if leachate is being […]

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Leachate Quality from Landfilled MBT Waste

Leachate Quality from Landfilled MBT Waste

In recent years there has been a trend toward MSW leachates from Sanitary Landfills throughout the world becoming more similar, however, as Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) is increasingly implemented and more Mechnanically Sorted Organic Residue (MSOR) [also known as “residual waste”] is produced in the supply area for a landfill, so the leachate quality of […]

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Help

This is our Software Help page.

1.  Is your software safe to use?

Our software is based upon a proprietory system for compiling the executable files which has been rigorously tested on all windows systems. However, in common with all other software providers, we can never be totally certain that someone may experience a problem while using it. It is safe as far as we can reasonably ascertain, however its use is at the risk of the user, and we accepat no liability. See out Terms of Use. It has also been virus checked and found free of infection.

2. How Do I Run Your Programs?

Simply unpack the zip files into a directory somewhere on your hard drive where you will be able to return to them easily. Once all the files have been “extracted” open the extracted folder and find the file which is listed as a .exe, (executable program) (it may be in the Source-Files folder). Double click on that file to “run” it and the software will open and run, presnting you with the initial window and further instructions appear to take you through using the program.

3. How Do I Install Your Programs?

The beauty of the software we provide is that the programs run without being installed. Just run the executable (.exe) file in the unzipped directory, as described in 2. above.

4. Why Does Windows Tell Me That This Software is an “Undefined Security Risk”

Microsoft is just pointing out that running any executable file brings a risk to your computer in the event that it contained a virus infection or other pernicious code, and you should not be unduly concerned about this for our software, beyond the normal precautions computer users should always take to run up to date anti-virus /security software in the background, on their computers.

Still Need Help?

We will be adding additional Frequently Asked Questions here, in response to our users queries, as they arise.

If you still have a problem after reading this page, we suggest that you email us with your question, via our Contact page on this blog. We will assist as soon as possible.

Leachate Fact File 2 – Contaminants Found in Leachate: Phenols

Be one of the first to buy this fact sheet! It’s the 2nd of a planned series of Leachate Contaminant Fact Files!

Our leachate fact sheets are based upon research carried out for the UK Department of Environment in the mid-1990s, updated and presented in bite-sized documents.

Penols Fact File 3D image

Designed as reference sources for leachate treatment scientists, regulatory bodies, and interested owners of landfill sites, these Fact Files come complete with a reference list for the original information sources, for those seeking to do further studies into the subject of each Fact File. (In this Fact File we cover a very important water contaminant which has been very controversial, and still does concern very many people.)

Although, this Fact File has been specifically created with the leachate management/ water quality specialist in mind, it contains much information which is relevant to the assessment of PCB hazards in any water body, and the environment generally.



This document is an ebook which is available as a Acrobat™ PDF file for immediate downloading at any time, day or night.

Store it on your hard drive for future reference
or print it out and keep it – it’s your choice!

We use Paypal as our payment processor, we will not be given your credit card details.

We will NEVER
sell or otherwise distribute your personal information!

  • Find out just how hazardous Phenols are likely to be when found at trace concentrations in leachate
  • Be able to assess the risk to the environment of Phenols at specific landfill sites by holding an understanding of the nature of the Phenol risks in cancer etc
  • Understand in principle how Phenols get into leachate
  • Find out how Phenol concentrations found commonly in leachate and compare this with other examples of Phenols contaminated water


Q: Are these fact files based upon information available elsewhere on the internet?

A: No. They are based upon peer reviewed technical papers, government reports (most of which have been archived), and to some extent on specialist professional environmental (mostly subscription) magazine articles published in the last 20 years. At least 80% is not freely available on the web, even if you had unlimited time to seek it out.


The price of this Fact File will be £15 when the full series is published
however, you – as an early buyer will get an “early-bird” discount and pay
just £13.75 inclusive of VAT.

Just think of the time it would take you to research this information yourself, even if the information was freely available? This is high value, and very specialised, information, at a remarkably low price!

Buy Your Fact File Here! Click here!

Add to Cart


Trace Contaminants Found in Leachate: Fact Files for You to Download

£d Image of Fact file ebook coverIf you have a problem with a substance found in leachate, we are here to help you! Our fact files, which are based on publicly published UK government research, are unique. You can save huge amounts of time hunting down this information which is otherwise spread very widely in published papers in libraries and on research databases, and is only partially accessible from the web.

What Are Trace Contaminants?

Landfill leachate invariably contains a host of different substances in addition to the major substances present (COD, BOD, Suspended solids, Metals in solution, Salinity, Ammoniacal nitrogen etc), which although only dissolved in tiny quantities (parts per million (ppm) and parts per billion (ppb)) still may represent a potential hazard to the environment and public health due to their extreme toxicity. To make a distinction between much higher concentrations of the main contaminants which are present in parts per thousand and more, and these lower concentration but much more toxic substances, the term “Trace Contaminants” is applied.

National and international standards have been set for the maximum permissible concentrations of many of these toxic (or “dangerous”) substances in drinking water, and under the EU Groundwater Directive no such substances are in principle permitted to be discharged to groundwater. In the UK these substances are often described as List 1 Substances, however since the creation of that list many more substances and species of contaminants have beeen identified which can now be analysed, and routinely reported upon within the description of “Dangerous Substances” as now applied by the environment Agency (EA).

How Does a Person Tasked With Deciding Whether a Leachate Contains Significant Quantities of Trace Contaminants Find Out About Them?

The first step is to analyse for them. Contact your water quality analytical laboratory and request a list of the subtsances they analyse when asked to complete what are variously called “List1”, “Dangerous Substances”, “or Comprehensive Prescribed List” analysis reports. Before you head off to the landfill to collect the necessary samples you will also need to await a package of special bottles which te analytical laboratory staff will prepare and send to you. Some of the se bottles wil include fixitive chemicals designed to prevent decay of some substances while en-route to the analytical test laboratory.

OK. So the Analytical Report Showed Some Dangerous Chemicals to be Present at Trace Concentrations. Does it matter? What Now?

Most leachates, especially those from older landfills, will show the presence of some of these chemicals. The next step is to decide whether they present a real hazard when the discharge route is taken into account. To do that we are writing and publishing a series of Leachate Contaminant Fact Files, each one of which will discuss the nature of a hazardous substance, or species of substances, and identify research papers written on the contaminant, to assit the reader in deciding whether the presence of the substance is significant and assist them in the decision either to treat the leachate to remove the susbtance, or to make a scientifically based case to the regulatory body or waste water treatment plant operator that negligable risk exists from the dangerous chemical at the concentration seen during water quality analysis.

Our first Leachate Contaminant Fact Files are Now Available. For more information, and purchase for immediate download, please click on the linked text below:

£d Image of Fact file ebook cover Leachate Trace Contaminant Fact File 1 – PCBs

Leachate Trace Contaminant Fact File 2 -Phenols

Leachate Fact File 1 – Contaminants Found in Leachate: POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS, PCBS

Be one of the first to buy this fact sheet! It’s the first of a planned series of Leachate Contaminant Fact Files!

Our leachate fact sheets are based upon research carried out for the UK Department of Environment in the mid-1990s, updated and presented in bite-sized documents.

£d Image of Fact file ebook cover

Designed as reference sources for leachate treatment scientists, regulatory bodies, and interested owners of landfill sites, these Fact Files come complete with a reference list for the original information sources, for those seeking to do further studies into the subject of each Fact File. (In this Fact File we cover a very important water contaminant which has been very controversial, and still does concern very many people.)

Although, this Fact File has been specifically created with the leachate management/ water quality specialist in mind, it contains much information which is relevant to the assessment of PCB hazards in any water body, and the environment generally.



This document is an ebook which is available as a Acrobat™ PDF file for immediate downloading at any time, day or night.

Store it on your hard drive for future reference
or print it out and keep it – it’s your choice!

We use Paypal as our payment processor, we will not be given your  credit card details.

We will NEVER
sell or otherwise distribute your personal information!

  • Find out just how hazardous PCBs are likely to be when found at trace concentrations in leachate
  • Be able to assess the risk to the environment of PCBs at specific landfill sites by holding a thorough understanding of the nature of the PCB threat and why it has caused all PCBs to have been banned
  • Understand in principle how PCBs build-up in living tissues
  • Be clear in your mind how it was that PCBs historically became known for their hazardous properties
  • Find out how PCB concentrations found commonly in leachate compare with other examples of PCB contaminated water, such as heavily trafficked highway rainwater run-off
  • Understand the reasons for the manner in which the whole family of PCBs have been analysed in the past for just a few of the many PCB isomers, and the limitations of some PCB analysis methods.


Q: Are these fact files based upon information available elsewhere on the internet?

A: No. They are based  upon peer reviewed technical papers, government reports (most of which have been archived), and to some extent on specialist professional environmental (mostly subscription) magazine articles published in the last 20 years. At least 80% is not freely available on the web, even if you had unlimited time to seek it out.


The price of this Fact File will be £15 when the full series is published
however, you – as an early buyer will get an “early-bird” discount and pay
just £13.75 inclusive of VAT.

Just think of the time it would take you to research this information yourself, even if the information was freely available? This is high value, and very specialised, information, at a remarkably low price!

Buy Your Fact File Here! Click here!