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leachate indicator parameters

The 3 Most Important Leachate Indicator Parameters

There are three very important leachate indicator parameters which are used as indicators to identify leachate contamination in any water sample analysed in a water quality laboratory. These three parameters can give an initial guide to anyone investigating what appears to be pollution occurring in the vicinity of a landfill, as to whether the source […]

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Software Resources

Mogden Calculator - Trade Effluent Charge Formula Calculator

We plan to add a number of leachate software applications to this page over the next few months, which our visitors can download and install, and which will provide solutions to a number of problems experienced by leachate treatment plant operators. Our first two are now available, a handy conversion calculator (see below), and (see right) our Trade Effluent Charges Calculator here.

Ammonia to Ammoniacal Nitrogen “Expressed as N” – Free Conversion Calculator

There are two methods used by analytical laboratories for expressing the quantity of ammonia in contaminated water. The first is that provided bythe majoirty of water quality analytical laboratories when reporting the quality of a polluted water. They provide a weight of ammonia as the weight of the nitrogen (elemental N), “ammoniacal- N” and that is the method  used by the Enviroment Agency UK.

However, some water quality labs report the weight of “ammonia”, (ie the whole NH4 molecule) which includes the weight of the hydrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen atoms, and landfill site operators may at times erroneously think that they are closer to their maximum permitted ammoniacal nitrgen strength for discharge, than they really are.

To help landfill operators correct for the difference between the two methods of expressing ammoniacal nitrogen values we devised the software below, which will walk you through how to calculate Ammoniacal-N (ammonia expressed in mg/l as N) concentrations (as used in UK Trade Effluent charging and dicsharge consents and environmental permits).

Get started now using our software, in three steps, as follows:

1. Simply download the zipped file below and unzip it into its own new directory location on your hard drive where you will be able to go back to it later.

2. Double click on the executable file (file extension “.exe”) called “ammonia-converter.exe”, and the software will load up and you can start to use it.

3. Follow the instructions given inside the software program.

For your free software DOWNLOAD click here >>>Ammonia to Ammoniacal-N Converter Software Package Version 1

Please give us your feedback by filling in a comment below about our Ammonia as Nitrogen (N) converter software, and if we like your suggestions we may be able to incorporate them into a later version.

What is Leachate?

What is Leachate? Here is some!The purpose of this section of our web site is to inform newcomers about the most common liquid referred to as, leachate – landfill leachate.

This whole web site has been written to answer the question; “What is leachate?” and how to ensure it does not cause pollution, in detail. So, we suggest that byexploring our site further you will find a more comprehensive answer to “What is leachate?, if you need it.

For now, we will give you the most concise answer to the question of what leachate is, by providing our definition of leachate below:

The Definition of Leachate

Leachate is the liquid that drains or ‘leaches’ from a landfill. It varies widely in composition regarding the age of the landfill and the type of waste that it contains. It usually contains both dissolved and suspended material.

In fact the term “leachate” is so often applied to landfill leachate, both within the waste management industry and outside, that it is easy to forget that leachate is the term used for any liquid produced by the action of “leaching”. Leaching occurs when water percolates through any permeable material.

Having Read the Answer to “What is Leachate” Most People Dislike It!

Treated leachate outfallOnce many people have the answer to their first question of; “What is leachate?”, they realize that it is pretty unpleasant stuff (it smells, can cause pollution etc.). Naturally,they often react by saying they would rather it was not produced. “Let’s not have any around here then”, being a common sentiment expressed!

In most temperate and tropical climates, landfills will unavoidably produce some leachate. To stop producing any leachate would in most cases entail sending “zero waste to landfill”. At the present time only a very few (probably less than a dozen) sizeable communities have been able to achieve what is known as “zero waste”. That means, for most of  us that there will still have to be actively operating landfills in our area.

No matter how hard landfill designers and operators try to avoid generating waste, through waste reduction, re-use, recycling, composting. Not to mention the many other methods of waste pre-treatment prior to landfilling. Landfilling will continue for many years yet, and thus leachate generation and its safe disposal without causing pollution, is a problem which is here to stay.

Even if all the landfills could be closed, and the creation of new leachate from rainfall falling on open (operational) landfill phase surfaces, could be stopped today, we would still have to manage the leachate from both the present operational sites,and all the old closed landfills.

There are many thousands of existing operational and closed landfill sites, which will continue to produce leachate for generations. For that reason following good practice in leachate minimisation, collection, treatment and disposal, is a very important part of the job of any landfill operator.