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The Leachate Expert Website

Tag Archives | waste management

A History of Landfill Leachate

A History of Landfill Leachate

How leachate is a very recent problem, and how it has been solved for the present generation. But, at what cost in the future?

A history of landfill leachate info_graphic

Are you worried about damage to the environment in the future from all that leachate
sitting in old landfills?

The alternative is to STOP landfilling as soon as possible by recycling almost everything.

The engineering methods used by the waste management industry to do that
and achieve close to “ZERO WASTE”  are known as the “New Waste Technologies”.

For more information on the New Waste Technologies click here.

leachate recirculation in a landfill

Leachate Recirculation Practise and Views

To the site operator leachate recirculation would certainly appear like commonsense as some of the leachate recirculated will be taken in by the waste and not re-appear. The leachate will gain some treatment – especially a significant reduction in BOD and COD by anaerobic digestion within a methanogenic landfill. In addition, if leachate is being […]

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Landfill leachate composition - image for page

Landfill Leachate Composition

Landfill leachate composition for United Kingdom Landfills was first published in the Waste Management Papers published by the UK Department of Environment. Waste Management Paper 26 contains the most recent table of Landfill Leachate Composition before the WMP series was superseded by later documents, notably the DoE’s Leachate Report of 1995. However, the original table, […]

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Leachate Quality from Landfilled MBT Waste

Leachate Quality from Landfilled MBT Waste

In recent years there has been a trend toward MSW leachates from Sanitary Landfills throughout the world becoming more similar, however, as Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) is increasingly implemented and more Mechnanically Sorted Organic Residue (MSOR) [also known as “residual waste”] is produced in the supply area for a landfill, so the leachate quality of […]

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What is Leachate?

What is Leachate? Here is some!The purpose of this section of our web site is to inform newcomers about the most common liquid referred to as, leachate – landfill leachate.

This whole web site has been written to answer the question; “What is leachate?” and how to ensure it does not cause pollution, in detail. So, we suggest that byexploring our site further you will find a more comprehensive answer to “What is leachate?, if you need it.

For now, we will give you the most concise answer to the question of what leachate is, by providing our definition of leachate below:

The Definition of Leachate

Leachate is the liquid that drains or ‘leaches’ from a landfill. It varies widely in composition regarding the age of the landfill and the type of waste that it contains. It usually contains both dissolved and suspended material.

In fact the term “leachate” is so often applied to landfill leachate, both within the waste management industry and outside, that it is easy to forget that leachate is the term used for any liquid produced by the action of “leaching”. Leaching occurs when water percolates through any permeable material.

Having Read the Answer to “What is Leachate” Most People Dislike It!

Treated leachate outfallOnce many people have the answer to their first question of; “What is leachate?”, they realize that it is pretty unpleasant stuff (it smells, can cause pollution etc.). Naturally,they often react by saying they would rather it was not produced. “Let’s not have any around here then”, being a common sentiment expressed!

In most temperate and tropical climates, landfills will unavoidably produce some leachate. To stop producing any leachate would in most cases entail sending “zero waste to landfill”. At the present time only a very few (probably less than a dozen) sizeable communities have been able to achieve what is known as “zero waste”. That means, for most of  us that there will still have to be actively operating landfills in our area.

No matter how hard landfill designers and operators try to avoid generating waste, through waste reduction, re-use, recycling, composting. Not to mention the many other methods of waste pre-treatment prior to landfilling. Landfilling will continue for many years yet, and thus leachate generation and its safe disposal without causing pollution, is a problem which is here to stay.

Even if all the landfills could be closed, and the creation of new leachate from rainfall falling on open (operational) landfill phase surfaces, could be stopped today, we would still have to manage the leachate from both the present operational sites,and all the old closed landfills.

There are many thousands of existing operational and closed landfill sites, which will continue to produce leachate for generations. For that reason following good practice in leachate minimisation, collection, treatment and disposal, is a very important part of the job of any landfill operator.